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, and when you look at recent report that the federal department of education presented basically has the definition of bullying in every single state and also a list of i think 37 components and ranks that show you state by state which ones include those components of it. as we heard earlier the federal department is close to approving a federal definition of bullying, so i do believe there is a lot of work in this area. i also think there is a lot of work going on in terms of evidence based practices in terms of interventions that is very exciting. some of the information that we know is that about 80% of the bullying that goes on can pretty much be handled by some very prescribed ways of dealing with things. 20% requires really very targeted social emotional behavioral approach and i think that as we get better at that knowing what methods work with which kids we're going to come a long ways in terms of the interventions and then being successful with those. >> thank you. >> a lot of folks talked about the culture of a school and improving the culture of a school. when i was do
that. we need to first get to be fair. if someone's got a dollar and he's educated and he should be in the slot or should be voted for, he should be able to. forget about the billions that people have getting themselves into office. i think it's terrible. host: all right, robert. we're going to leave it there. we're going to take a break from our discussion regarding term limits for elected officials and talk about a decision that was handed down by the federal court of appeals yesterday. to talk to us about that, we're going to bring in josh hicks of the "the washington post," the federal blogger. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. host: the lead in this morning's "the washington post," your paper, says boil boil officials -- says obama officials ruled in power, courts cut power of appointment, judges limit action during senate recesses. the president exceeded his constitutional authority by making appointments when the senate was on a break last year, a federal appeals court ruled friday the court's broad ruling would sharply limited power that pr
" and we have been around for about 32 years. we're nonprofit and we do both education and advocacy and on the education end we develop be curriculum and the curriculum is used widely across the country. it's in every state in the country and in canada and 70 countries around the world and programs we're familiar with is second step and i am hearing some nods and we have a -- idea of kind of what kind of things that we do, and i also do advocacy work so i come and speak at meetings like this. i was at the attorney general's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the s
for the politician who is going to help them get their kid a better education or get their mother in a better situation for elder care facility. >> gavin: the frustration for me is you've got extraordinary people. i really believe this in politics who are trapped by an extraordinarily bad system you saw this with president obama who said i can't stand these super pacs but realized you cannot unilaterally disarm if you're in this game, and he would be crushed and rolled over. how do we reconcile that. good people trapped in a bad system. how do we ultimately manifest that. >> well, i think you need someone who breakaway and who will understand, and i believe this to be true, if they say i will not take super pac money that the people who hate the campaign finance system will come to them and say this is a different politician. >> gavin: yeah. >> and that is a tough choice. i appreciate that, but i do believe, in fact that in this day and age where the issue of money and politics is just pervasive and ordinary every day conversation that a candidate could be quite successful in this regard. >>
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young pe
what would you invest in?" . i would invest in education and we're not investing in the future of the children and the in the country and the global future of our world and i agree absolutely with everything you said. we're short changing our kids and not giving teachers the resources. there is mold in the teacher's work room. if i worked in the building that many children go to school in i wouldn't go to work either and in answer to your question there is a priority here about education that's not quite right. >> and while we're earmarking money i would totally support that and i feel that we should train teachers in digital media. you can't teach cooking out a kitchen, so we need to bring digital media into the classroom so people can practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring
that was taking away from the value. they need education. when you go through the first process there is a checklist as to what you should be bringing in if you're going to the hearing. >> thank you so much. thank you ms. nelson. next we have shawn ridgell. okay. next we have daniel hershkowitz. >> how do you do? >> how do you do. >> please ask me the same question at the end. i am a real estate attorney and arrested broker in san francisco. i have been here for half of my life, true in a couple of months. i have been a real estate attorney for the last 15 years here san francisco and for a few years in oakland. for the last 12 years i have worked primarily as a real estate broker. i have quite a bit of experience with the appraisal process. i am a homeowner here in san francisco. that is in true; i have been a renter for the last two months; for the previous 15 years, an owner of single-family homes and a few condos and also the landlord. i understand all of those perspectives. i also was the president and secretary depending on the year of homeowners associations; i have been
.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site administrators to encourage them to get this
's working and what's not. >> we seem to think that education's a thing, like a vaccine that can be designed from afar and simply injected into our children. >> the embattled oakland police department brings on an expensive consultant, but his tough tactics are generating controversy. >> i vote against this contract tonight is not about not being serious about crime. >> apple stock takes a plunge. it's something taking a bite out of innovation at the silicon valley giant. >>> plus. i'm here at the new sfja strzz center in san francisco. we'll go on a behind the scenes tour to find out what makes this place so groundbreaking. coming up. >>> good evening. welcome to "this week in northern california." it's been an eventful week with the governor's address from the state capital, emotions running high in oakland. not to mention a new one of a kind arts institution celebrating a grand opening in san francisco. we have much to get to. let's begin by introducing our panelists. joining me tonight, matthai kuruvila, "san francisco chronicle" reporter. jolie o'dell, of venturebeat.com. as well as joh
with wells fargo today to award 20 education grants. >> starting at shortstop number 35 brandon crawford. >> >> crawford took the podium this morning in front of dozens of students and adults from bay area schools. they will share $75,000 in new funding. >> grant programs like these. our employees to give back to the education and programs. take advantage of the ability to get an education and work hard to pursuit a dream. >>> crawford grew up in pleasanton and says his school teacher/mother thought him to always value his education. >>> coming up in five minutes. >> it's something every parent may want to know. how to raise your child's iq. >> the simple steps you can take which may be able to do just that. >>> and later the report card is in and california gets a d. >> and our system definitely needs to be more consistent, coherent. >> the shortcoming that may be leaving new teachers unprepared. >>> why the disturbing unsolved murder of this elderly bay area commuter is making headlines again. >>> breaking news happening right now in oak land. -- oakland. we are just getting word of a
to continue doing something about it. if anything, our goal is of course to educate our youth; to make sure they understand that they have partners in both city government and in the community to help. those that are lucky and can survive; all of this and when they end up on the shores of san francisco, if we can find them and provide them with support and help them change their lives. and then get to the business of the criminal acts involved in exploiting our kids. we should do all of that and this trafficking. i want to thank everybody for being here today, helping celebrate this event recognizing the awareness month but also recommitting ourselves in every possible way to do what we can do to end this on a worldwide basis and to know the source businesses and individuals and groups of people organized to continue this effort and to do our best to end their activities as well. i want to make sure that i think both emily but also nancy goldberg for your interest as well not only interest but your work as a native san franciscan to do everything that you have been doing to e
you. thank you. >> where do began. no matter whether you know about education or not, let's turn to the banking world. investing in very young children is the best investment you can make. it has the greatest return on investment, and we know that because the first three years of life for the most important for cognitive, social, and emotional development. you are only two years old ones. that is the most significant window of time, and i think there must be an incident or a toddler in here, which brings me to the next point, yes we have class warfare, but it is unusual class warfare. those who are poor are completely left out. it is a bipartisan effort to keep people who are pouring out of the national dialogue. that is why i started witness to hunter, which is working to be able to provide direction testimony on their experiences on raising children in poverty, and i will tell you there are so many conversations. the fact people have been silent for so many years, that is a mass of a trail. the first thing the women who are poor will tell you is that poverty is solvable. they e
, the bully project, and we have been bringing the film and educating, training professional development largely thriewr our partnership with them and provides that to school districts and classrooms across the country for free, so educators can sign up, and if they agree to do the training and to take it seriously and embed it with the kids and the adults in the community we provide them with oftentimes busing, but often free tickets so they can see the film outside of school and make it an event and that is our project "1 million kids". we're doing it in a big way here in the bay area thanks to the leadership in this community. yep and oakland and all over. it's just awesome and in cleveland and right now we have 13,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting
to balance california's budget. he also pushed for his priorities including education and regulatory reform. now, john, how would you rate his speech and what left the biggest impressions on you? >> well, you know, rating the speech, a speech from jerry brown is really tough to do because it's unlike any other speech you get from any other governor. how many governors go from the book of genesis to "the little engine that could" in one 25-minute speech? this was a vintage jerry brown speech. i think really what you saw here was a little bit of the governor running a victory lap. proposition 30 passed. temporary taxes passed. the budget looks a lot better. i think this was the governor's chance to pivot, to pivot to talking about what makes california great, how we get them back on track. don't worry, we're getting there. so i took this as a real optimistic speech with a lot of details, a lot of brown history facts. and really a message i think not only to the legislature but to the public of, like, i'm watching it. we're going to be careful, but we're going to move forward. >> and, john, yo
other children as well, and detectives want to hear from additional victims. >> the u.s. education department announced today that every public school in america will have to include stid yents with disabilities in after school sports programs. >> we're not talking about physical education for kids with disability that's exists. this would mean allowing thom participate in after school sports. now, school woz have to make reasonable modifications for them, or they would have to reyait a kind of alternative. sophia's fancy foot work gained her a spot on the soccer team. we're surprised when she showed us her prosthetic leg. >> this is the liner. her school encourages all students, including those with disabilities to tryout for any sport. >> there is nothing different about me except for my legs. and i can just deal with that. >> and in cases the school makes the proper adom daigs autos a child hearing impaired we may need visual cues. whether there is something else for a child that needs something. >> willard doing a lot whaft u.s. department of education will require schools to d
in advocacy we have a strong, strong goal of educating our public and all the other kids and families in our city. this is a way of our quality of life, we cannot accept human trafficking. part of the way to do that is to have this be part of the kids education, and push strongly. the collaborative this year, allow the youth of san francisco to enter in a poster contest to provide artistic ability to the messaging of this really important movement. the 2013 poster contest winners i get to announce. i will begin with third-place winners. the third-place winner, first one eighth-grade student, from james brannan middle school. shelley lu (sounds like) apl(applause) also an eighth-grade student from james dunham as well, stella lee. thank you. apl(applause) (applause) to be an eighth-grader. the collaborative has chosen for the second place at 12 greater, from abraham lincoln high school. stephanie chung (applause) and then we have a number of first place winners. i'm sure this is all about collaboration, talking about it, what it means absorbing the purpose and working together
important. so i thought i'd mention that. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the a
that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you jumped ahead to several of my questions so you don't get to talk anymor
that politicians fix every problem. that is how we got obamacare, a federal education department, and they drug war. the voters they do something. that's why i wrote my book, "no, they can't." as we begin, what can we do it we disagree with president obama's big government vision? mark meckler and starlee rhoades has some ideas. they have the citizens for self-governance. starlee rhoades is president of the goldwater institute. both say we can return power to the states. what do you mean? start with obamacare. >> state should establish health insurance exchanges. twenty-five states said go right ahead, the policy on your own. you will have to implement it on your own watch. it protects and stops massive subsidies from being paid out from insurance companies and it protects people from being told on by the irs. john: the exchange is a place where you go on the web and it helps you buy an insurance policy. he insurance does that at no cost to the taxpayer. i don't know why it has to be such a big deal or cost so much. >> that is what the federal government will do, and extinction each day. but the th
in our kids education, to draw from our state reserve to put us further in the hole to me is the wrong approach. >> supervisor campos. >> supervisor campos i would like to begin by welcoming once again our newly elected colleagues, supervisors yee and breed. it is exciting when we take our own new board of supervisors, and i look forward to working with you. there are many votes that we cast in this chamber and in some respects it is only fitting that one of the first votes that this new board starting its new term takes is his vote. this is one of the most important issues that we will be dealing with in one of the most important vote that we will be taking as his term proceeds. supervisor kim, i want to thank you for your leadership but i want to piggyback about what supervisor avalos said, talking about in some respects two different cities. and what happens to some people in san francisco. we are a city of great wealth. we have because of a lot of different reasons we are fortunate enough that we have more resources in san francisco then many places throughout the state and throu
heartburn. satisfaction guaranteed or your money back. >>> before brown versus board of education, there was another directive by harry s. truman which banned diskrcrimination o anyone in the military regard l regardless of race, creed or religious beliefs. it with was a historical truth that the u.s. military described as an engine of war by progressives has been a leading institution for fight for racial equality, and because the military leaders carry great weight with many americans, i thought i would remind one american in particular just where the military stands on a decision he will be making very soon. my letter this week is to supreme court chief justice john roberts as he considers a challenge to the affirmative action program at the university of texas. dear chief justice roberts, it is me, e melissa. remember last june you were the deciding vote to uphold the affordable health care act, yeah? well, that was a cool way to ensure the legacy and in truth, it gave me faith that despite your ideologically derived positions and the willingness to overturn established preced
representing a wide area of government agencies, law enforcement agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you. why don't we do that? why waste a
almost four years ago as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that end. >> we have a wonderful or
simple, understandable concepts as to the foundation of your case and you have to do that to educate the jury and to educate the judge. a lot of these people have not dealt with graffiti cases. you have somebody professing to be an expert and ask the questions thateled his expertise and this guy does not know. it puts a big hole in his expertise right off. so we wanted to have something consistent. now if you probably present this information, it will essentially establish the officer as a credible expert. at that point you can start rendering expert decisions. in trainings that you go to should be set up in such a way that every jurisdiction has an expert. sometimes you have to piggy back on somebody else's expertise. that will come in handy when he can talking to city hall people about allocation of resources, to his department about al case of resources, how he is going to set up the program and how he is going to make the investigations and how he is going to successfully take them to court? and there are experts in here, i know and i know they know if you have kind of knowle
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of the paper mill last year, putting 175 people back to work making 100% recycled paper. i had this to say about washington. innovation is in our genes. [applause] we create. we invent. we build. so now we must go forward, with both high ambition and a recognition that the power of innovation will fuel the next wave of job growth in washington. make no mistake, our top priority today, tomorrow, and every day for the next four years, is jobs. we must build a working washington, capable of sustained economic leadership in a rapidly changing world. my plan focuses on job growth in seven industry clusters. aerospace, life sciences, military, agr
of diseases, to what extent have been noticed efforts to educate the human population on how to modify their lifestyle so it is better to avoid the crossover and spillover? >> there are certainly efforts. in bangladesh they're trying to educate people not to drink raw date palm staff that contains a virus. if you put the stuff you can kill the virus but people like to drink it raw. it is a tradition, a seasonal treat so there are things like that around the world. in southern china they crack down on the big what markets, at least above ground, and big wedge markets, sold live for food as a fashion in southern china, they call it wild flavor, a vote for eating wild life, not because people need the protein for subsistence, they have some money and this is considered a very robust and tasty food. one other thing on that in terms of education, of local people, i mentioned the original spillover, pandemic strain in southeastern cameron, i went to retrace probably the route it took coming out of southeastern cameron and down a river system that came along the main stem condo and eventually
students and faculty members who want to improve their education or career. >>> it is the defense's turn now in the misconduct trial of the anne arundel county executive john leopold accused of using his detail to make sexual encounters and keep tabs on his political enemies. today the judge dropped one of the five charges against him because the state did not meet its burden of proof. >>> hundreds of thousands of pro life demonstrators packed onto the national mall on d.c., their goal to get the supreme court to overturn the historic decision in honor of what they call abortion's 55 million victims. >> reporter: undaunted by bitterly cold temperatures and of a snow forecast pro life marchers came to washington as they have for four decades determined to instill a culture of life in a nation that they say has seen 55 million abortions since the landmark decision row v wade was handed down. >> can a nation endure that does not respect the sanctity of life? >> reporter: the question is backed by stunning numbers. the pro choice institute finds four in 10 unintended pregnancies in the u.s
agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't b
, 50 or more. how do we educate those landlords that basically are mom and pop type landlords? the live on one flat and there is another flat. one of the issues with smaller homeowners, property owners, they seem to be not as sophisticated and aware of all these new things that go on. i will like to see some education program do some outreach. and make sure that their tenants will have the benefits. >> supervisor mar. >> supervisor mar: that's a great suggestion. the department of health is working with tenant organizations. making sure that not only representative groups but smaller property owners have multilingual materials. the department of public health has been working at the small business level and other places and we need an outreach policy. that's a great suggestion. >> i want to thank supervisor yee of raising the issue of small mom-and-pop landlords who may not always be aware of all the regulations and we need to outreach to them. in addition to the apartment association, -- >> i forgot to mention that supervisor malia cohen is a cosponsor. >> president: can we take
families, our neighbors, are own with education. this is a promise lives lost. to be open to all possibilities. there is no agenda other than to make our community a safer and better place. this is a promise. to have a conversation on all the issues. conversations where listening is as important as speaking. conversations were even those with the most opposing views can debate and goodwill. this is a promise. to turn the conversations to action things must change. this is a time. this is a promise. we make to our precious children because each human life is filled with promise and we continue to be filled with unbearable pain; we choose love, belief, hope instead of anger. this is a promise. to make everything in our part not as a place with victims but a place where real change can be made. our hearts are broken. our spirits are not. this is a promise. as a parent i have never had anything hit so close to home as it did the other day. the second item is a hearing at a different vein to discuss and have it public and open dialogue about the cleanliness of our streets and open sp
got obama care a federal education department, a drug war. the voters say do something. it's a natural instinct. that's why i wrote "no they can't." politicians promise to problems, but they can't. off fen we can without government. so, as we begin what can we do if we disagree with president obama's big government vision? mark mekler has ideas. he has the group called citizens for self governance. rose is vice president of the labor tearilibertarian gold waw institute. start with obama care. >> states shall establish health insurance exchanges if they don't do it the government will do it for them. several states said go ahead force a policy on your own we are not going to do it. you have to implement your own laws. it protects businesses and they're states from fines. it stops massive subsidies and on to the irs. >> it is an exchange that invites you to go on the web. it is no cost to the tax payer. if 25 states say no we cont step them up. >> they will end up doing an exchange in each state. taxpayers will be protected from the worst part of the federal healthcare law if their state
to the hearing process. we use it as an opportunity to educate the public even when i'm a rule against them i try to give them an explanation about why i have reached that conclusion and what they might do to obtain assistance. i know the last hearing there was a woman who spoke chinese. and she brought a flyer. it was written in chinese. she really needed assistance. i was able to communicate with them. next time she should bring an interpreter or someone who can help her through the communication process. >> i assume we also provide interpretation if requested in advance? >> don -- would be the person to respond. >> maybe donna can address that after we hear from the applicant. it is very important that we provide interpreters ourselves. >>that has been an issue. >> especially for language involved. >> thank you very much. >>thank you. >>next we have ms. louisa mendoza. >> good afternoon to the panel ladies and gentlemen. my name is louisa mendoza, resident of san francisco for over 25 years. from south america via the caribbean. i am seeking a permanent appointment. also substituting in the bo
? >> well, they take all kinds of courses. they get a very grounded education in the basic business disciplines -- things like... but then, they also get classes that are very directly related to the industry. >> just click that. it'll bring up your rate screen. >> that means learning how to run a hotel or restaurant, and learning how to buy one, too. >> eventually, we want them to grow, as well, to not just run hotels but to someday own them and own entire chains of hotels. >> what do you like best about this school? >> i mean, if "everything" was a choice or an answer, i would choose everything. the hotel school is great. you learn all the great business practices that you learn at a typical business school, but applied to hospitality. >> so, where are we going? >> we're going to the food lab. >> the school attracts students from all over the world. they're proud of their nickname... on campus, they're known as the "hotelies." is that okay with you? >> "hotelies." it's a moniker that, you know, in a way, is something we've outgrown. but it's also very near and dear to our students
problem going on and that is educational. the lathe operator now replaced by a machine . the guy who operates that is a guy with computer knowledge. we are not educating our work force to support the kind of tech lodgical economy that we are going through. >> johnathon a new high in the stock market makes us take our eye off of the ball on unemployment. >> i am glad to see the market up, eric. but president obama's recovery is worst in moderp history . i think wayne's point all of the entitlements that we built up. that intervention prolongs the crisis and worsens the crisis. a lot of the countries that have systemic unemployment. france never had that low since the 1980s. bigger government grows and bigger medockity grows. >> if things are so good out of washington d.c. and hear it out of the obama administration on the recovery. how come 47 million americans are on food stamps and the number that we spend on food stamps tripled under obama's watch? >> look, i agree with you. there is no recovery that we can measure here and you can point to how many people are out of work and lost
, as i mentioned earlier, the grants, the money, the department of education has issued 11 grants to schools. we need more, we will see as budget proposals the president's and the secretary's real commitment to this to ensure that we have some resources for innovative programs that are happening across the country for those local programs that are really changing the way their schools function and their communities see their schools and promoting those and scaling them up. >> very quickly because i know we want to move on, the attorney general launched a defending childhood initiative, i know there's a lot of philanthropy in the room, we want to work in partnership to find those innovative programs. there was a jurisdiction in north dakota that got a grant to implement some of the restoretive justice programs, the superintendent mentioned those. those have shown real potential for doing good things in terms of preventing recidivism in the bullying context. a grant to boston for statewide bullying intervention, so there's a number of different places, portland, maine and elsewhe
. then there is everything else, food, education, infrastructure, everything else the federal government does. ryan doesn't really say exactly which programs he is really cutting here. but it is where he is cutting. he gets four and a half times this budget as he does from medicare. it is about half the total cuts and it is a huge cut. we don't know the programs that will get the axe, but he has given us enough detail on it, to say that about two thirds of ryan's budget cuts comes from programs for the poor. but that is quite a bit. and he is still not balancing the budget until 2038. so how is ryan going to take the budget, which is already pretty rough and has pretty unpopular policies in it and get it to balance in ten years as opposed to 30? ironically, one thing that actually helps him a lot is the fiscal cliff deal, baecause it actually raises taxes. here is his explanation. >> all right, can you get to balance in ten years and not raise revenues? >> yes, yes, the revenue baseline is obviously higher now that we have this cliff behind us. >> i want you to listen to that again. they asked paul ryan,
to have the children they want, to educate the children they had and keep them safe. so it really has to do with, how do we define women in our society? are they full and equal participants? and the best way, the seemingly sort of neutral way of undermining their personhood, is to focus on the issue of abortion. >> for us, our slogan is "health, dignity, and justice." and when you think about compulsory pregnancies, it's taking away health, dignity, and justice from a woman. many of the women, the latinas that we work with that have experienced abortion are in their 20s, have a child already, and are -- >> and why do they want an abortion? >> because they're not in an economic situation they -- >> they can't afford a second child? >> they perhaps can't afford a second child, they want to go to school, they might be at a point in their career. the reasons range, quite frankly. it's really important that women that we work with, mostly latina, immigrant, women of color, those at the margins, low income, are able to access their rights in a way without barriers and further bureaucratic o
. manufacturers have barbershops that supply them and local cafeter cafeterias. to educate communities around the world that this is vital for job growth because we have a jobs crisis today, ali, and manufacturing is the solution space for the jobs crisis. >> so, andrew liveris talking about job creation. the theme of dynamism has emerged over the course of the week here to jobs. >> i came here thinking they were absolutely stark-raving mad with resilient dynamism. now i'm starring to think it was a stroke of genius because it's allowed everybody to grab onto something and that developed into the theme jobs. >> well, listen, a few long working days here at davos. we've interviewed a lot of people, attended a lot of sessions. some of the best work is done just in the hallway having conversations with people. but this is a beautiful place and a pretty fun place to be. there are a lot of [ indiscernible ]s and parties and of course the skiing. richard, before we got started, hit the slopes. but being the true journalist that he is, you asked people how they were feeling about the economy. what d
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